Chronic Stress and Dementia; Hormones and Brain Health; Dementia Protection Neurons?

Derick Alison
Derick Alison
2 Min Read

Documented chronic stress increased the risk of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease, a Swedish cohort study showed. (Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy)

Researchers provided details about the death of a Duchenne muscular dystrophy patient after high-dose recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy. (New England Journal of Medicine)

Neuroinflammation was associated with dementia risk in people with Parkinson’s disease. (Brain)

An Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy program reduced depressive symptoms in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), a phase III trial showed. (Lancet Digital Health)

Women with longer exposure to endogenous hormones had a relatively smaller burden of cerebral small vessel disease. (Neurology)

A distinct region within the amygdala may be associated with persistent breathing failure after seizures. (JCI Insight)

An allele of the genetic variant rs10191329 in the DYSF-ZNF638 locus was associated with brain atrophy in people with MS. (Annals of Neurology)

Two groups of inhibitory neurons were more abundant in people with preserved high cognitive function late in life, including those with Alzheimer’s pathology. (Cell)

A former memory-loss clinic director in Ohio and her physician husband were sentenced on federal fraud charges; the couple had been accused by patients of falsely diagnosing them with Alzheimer’s disease. (AP)

The film “Great Absence” shares the perspective of an estranged son struggling to learn about his father, who has dementia. (Variety)

  • Judy George covers neurology and neuroscience news for MedPage Today, writing about brain aging, Alzheimer’s, dementia, MS, rare diseases, epilepsy, autism, headache, stroke, Parkinson’s, ALS, concussion, CTE, sleep, pain, and more. Follow

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